40 – Finding Calm through Movement with Joy Onyschak

written by Joy Onyschak (SomaSensing Somatic Movement Therapist, Numa Breathwork Facilitator) on 14/05/20

40 – Finding Calm through Movement with Joy Onyschak

 
 
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What is somatic movement and SomaSensing TM? ‘Soma’ means to perceive body from within. Somatic Movement means movement that arises from felt sense. SomaSensing TM is a somatic movement therapy that places the body (specifically the fascia and nervous system) at the heart of healing.

As a somatic movement therapist, why does this practice feel really important to offer right now?

It’s efficient, simple and effective. Because of the current situation with COVID-19, many people are experiencing some sort of nervous system dysregulation. This is showing up in my own body periodically as numbing out due to information overload, experiencing strong emotions, difficulty sleeping, digestive issues and tension in my body. SomaSensing is intended to help us regulate our nervous systems through simple, gentle, and efficient movements. Many of us don’t have a lot of time for self-care right now and life feels overly complicated. This practice offers a simple solution to access calm through the body.

There are many types of somatic movement practices, what makes this practice unique?

  • It is invitational, so it cultivates curiosity, accessibility, and agency. People learn how to choose what feels good and right for them instead of following along  
  • The practices is informed by current fascial research, The Polyvagal Theory (nervous system and trauma theory of Dr. Stephen Porges) and Biotensegrity principles (in a nutshell, that our bodies are capable of finding efficiency in movement if we allow it to).  
  • It is truly a ‘felt-sense’ practice. In the beginning, guidance is provided to assist participants to their own intuitive movement patterns, and there are no templates, sequences or right/wrong ways to do things. The body leads the way
  • The goal of the practice is wholeness. Through finding what feels good, learning how to comfort oneself, even finding joy in their body again, participants experience a sense of wellness often described as wholeness.

How and where do you offer this practice? 

I offer private session on-line or in person here at Safe Harbour Therapy in Winnipeg, a 4-week introductory course on-line, and I guide weekly on-line group classes.

What does a private session look like?

A private session is about an hour long. After a brief intake, through observing and inviting, I guide the participant to find simple, gentle movements that feel good and create space and suppleness in their bodies. Exactly what happens in a session varies for everybody. Sometimes realizations and emotions may arise, and generally everyone experiences some sort of beneficial change in how they feel their body (i.e. stiffness, pain, and tension transform to softness, space and ease).

Tell me more about the Intro course and your weekly classes.

  • I offer the 4-week introductory course that provides people with a combination of practice time and basic, foundational theory while learning in community. The course is meant to get people to a place where they can practice on their own and weave it into their daily life.
  • The course is comprise of  4-90 min classes (30-40 min in movement/experience, approximately 20 min theory and 20-30 min in community dialogue).
  • I also offer a weekly group practice for participants to continue learning in community, and participants from the course are invited to join.

If someone is experiencing overwhelming sensations in their body (perhaps recovering from trauma), how would you recommend they start this practice?

Going within and sensing what is there can be overwhelming for some people for a variety of reasons. I recommend those experiencing overwhelming sensations or recovering from trauma to work with me privately to assist with feeling safe and comfortable with the practice before joining a group.

What has your experience been offering this work on-line compared to in person? 

I’ve really enjoyed offering this work on-line over the past few months. I have been part of an on-line ‘Holding Space’ learning group for about 3 years, so I have been holding space via zoom long before it was so popular. There are many advantages to the on-line space such as accessibility and being in the comfort of your own home. All you need is a quiet, uninterrupted space.

When/How can people try this practice out?

If listeners enjoyed this talk, I invite them to;

Thanks so much for taking time to listen and read. Wishing everyone wellness and ease.

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